I'm a first-semester freshman, which means I am constantly meeting people.

I probably introduce myself to someone new at least once a day.

I am not one to judge people based on their first impressions. Someone could be having an off day or not in the mood to randomly strike up a conversation with the extroverted blonde girl before their 8:00 a.m. (that is me by the way).

However, I would like to believe I can get a pretty good read on a person based on their name. Over the course of my 18 years on this planet I have met many people and I believe your name can say a lot about you.

Let’s start with the best name anyone could ask for: Grace. Believe it or not, I didn’t always love my name. The main reason was because of its popularity.

I went to Catholic school my entire life, so I was bound to run into another girl named Grace. Growing up, I was never Grace at school. I was always Grace C., and let me tell you, that one extra syllable drove me crazy.

When I got to high school, I thought it would change. However, I soon found out that I was one of eight Graces in my grade. That means one in every ten girls were named Grace. I tried many different nicknames to pull me apart from the crowd, but none of them stuck.

It wasn’t until my junior year of high school that I realized how much I loved my name. I think Grace is a great representation of who I am as a person, and I have discovered this in other names as well.

From pure observations, I have found that people with solid and traditional names tend to be pretty standard people.

I am not bashing these people at all. I grew up in a family where all our names were pretty basic.

However, if you think about it, people with traditional or classic names tend to be run-of-the-mill people.

This is not always a bad thing. My younger brother’s name is Charles and he is a pretty classic guy. He is hardworking, very future-focused, kind-hearted, and sometimes stubborn. I feel as if he fits the name Charles almost perfectly.

My other brother’s name is Jack and he is pretty similar to Charles. Jack and Charles are super similar people, and their names are almost identical in overall vibe. Jack is hardworking, super sweet, and stubborn, but he differs in the sense that he is more free-spirited. He beats to his own drum.

People I have met with more unique names tend to be more unique people. I have yet to meet a boring or “normal” person with a unique name. They are all different in a unique or special way.

An example of this would have to be the people who go by their last name. They are often the funniest people in the room, and I think that most people would agree that they all have distinct personality traits that you just can’t put your finger on.

I have also noticed that people with sim- ilar names often gravitate toward each other. An excellent example of this is my best friend from back home, Claire. Claire and I are very similar and tend to agree on almost everything. Like Jack and Charles, Claire and Grace have a very similar vibe to it.

I have seen this with other friendship duos throughout my life as well, Avery and Sophie, Matt and Josh, Lily and Hannah, and the list goes on.

Another example of this would be my love for people named Grace. I find that I am very similar to most Graces I meet. I have yet to meet a Grace that I have disliked.

I know it is terrible to stereotype people, but I’d like to think I can get a good read on someone based on their first name or nickname.

Think about your own name, what do you think it says about you and your self-identity?

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